Hive Five: October 11, 2016

tech and millenials

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Technology Is Making It Easier for Millennials to Get Involved

If they weren’t engaged through memes, campaign hashtags, or current events, millennials are being reminded to register to vote in the platforms that are most native to them. Snapchat (via TurboVote), Facebook (via vote.gov), and apps like Hello Vote make the registration process as easy as selecting a geofilter or posting a status. A practice that used to be burdensome is now, with the help of social media, an easy step, engrained into users’ daily routine. Marketers should notice that by disrupting a consumer in this “native” environment, they’re replicating the behavior that is natural to consumers and providing utility, which will create a better UX in the end.

 

 


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Obsession with True Crime and Unsolved Murders

From Serial to Netflix’s “Making a Murderer” and Amanda Knox stories, unsolved murder mysteries are attracting a mass following. For many, these open-ended mysteries or seemingly wrongful accusations present a chance for them to come up with their own theories or solutions and, in several cases, reopen a cold case. Instead of telling stories that are predictable, or campaigns that have obvious “ends” to their means, perhaps there’s something to be said about leaving it up to the consumer to interpret on their own. Give the people what we’ve forgotten they want – a chance to think for themselves. Give them the power to draw their own conclusions, versus revealing it or telling them how they should think or behave.

 


 

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Nonsensical Memes

“When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro,” gonzo journalist Hunter S. Thompson once said – and it looks like the Internet has taken that advice. From presidential debate questioner Ken Bone to Pepe the Frog, vibes online are becoming increasingly senseless. Is the newest way to rate how viral a meme will become to simply ask, “How little sense does this make?”

It looks like the going has gotten weird – and the time has come for brands to show they can be pros.

 

 

 


 

Parent shaming

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We Need to Talk About Parent-Shaming…

Traditionally, advertising toward parents has been consistent with the widespread parenting culture: follow these rules, be the perfect parent, don’t talk about your mistakes. And, in some ways, the reasoning for that is clear – from tragic gorilla and alligator accidents to missing a child’s first day of school, the Internet has been quick to shame parents for their “wrongdoings.” However, parents have recently responded to this shaming with stories of their struggles and imperfections. Brands have an opportunity to leverage the emerging judgement-free movement, which often takes a humorous approach, and present their product or service to the imperfect, authentic parent.

 


 

Bon Iver Symbols

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Symbols Bring Deeper Meaning to Pop Culture

Grammy Award-winner Bon Iver’s most recent album, “22, A Million,” was released on September 30th. The central story of the album is one of discovering hidden personal truths through a difficult process of introspection. The meaning of the songs, and even the track names, are difficult to connect with. In today’s largely accessible world, vague titles like “21 M♢♢N WATER” represent a countertrend in which only the most dedicated fans, who take the time to search deeper, are rewarded. Brands more often want to be easy to get, quick to search, and in the mainstream. However, in social posts and with certain imagery, there can be ways to show some depth and intrigue – brands should reward their “biggest fans” with a special, different experience that appeals to their intelligence.